Sam Quinn’s Success.

September 1, 2014

This is a story, entirely fictional, of a young boy who thought he was following his dreams.

Sam Quinn, a young aspiring artist, moved to the city. He did not visit the sites, he did not see the Queen, he simply stayed in his attic studio flat and painted.

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He had forgotten time. The only indicators of the days passed were the scarcity of clean socks in his drawer and the wall of free newspapers blocking the front door. Sam Quinn decided it was time to leave the house.

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He walked up and down Gallery Street and visited gallery after gallery, trying to get his work exhibited.

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But he was laughed out the door every time.

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Filled with grief and remorse, Sam Quinn returned to his attic flat and did the only thing he could do. He painted. He painted and painted in such a frenzy that he broke his paintbrush.

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And cut his hand.

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An art dealer had heard of this young frenetic painter and decided to stop by his studio. Sam was shocked and delighted. He nervously but excitedly, almost forcefully, took the dealer around his small flat and showcased all of his best work. But the art dealer, uninterested by Sam’s depictions of cities and skies, picked up from the floor the abandoned and blood stained canvas.

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The art dealer loved this accidental masterpiece so much that he used all of his connections to get the young unknown artist an exhibition in a top gallery downtown. All of the finest members of society came along and the reviews were outstanding.

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Sam Quinn was the talk of the town: the critics wanted to know him, the press wanted to know him and the gallery owners who had rejected him a few weeks previous were now knocking at his door.

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Sam Quinn enjoyed the success and happily responded to the demand for more of his now trademark bloodstained pieces.

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One member of the art public who was a particular fan of Sam’s wanted to commission some work, but he wanted it more of them and he wanted them more vibrant, more red.

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More red meant more blood. Sam Quinn was unsure whether to carry out this almost surgical commission or whether to pack it in and move back to the country.

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He did it. He could not give up at this pivotal moment of his artistic career. Without art, life was not worth living.

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But this art made living an impossibility. After completing the sixth painting of the ‘Red’ series, Sam Quinn died of blood loss. The words spoken at his funeral painted Sam Quinn as a dedicated young soul, whose art was his life. But everyone sat in the audience understood that as art was his life, he had made it his death.

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43 Responses to “Sam Quinn’s Success.”

  1. Wow what a great story and have to admit it Quinn is both smart and stupid

  2. What a wonderful piece. Such a great story about the consequences of chasing our dreams at all costs.

  3. techwriter145 said

    That is the most beautiful story I’ve ever read. It’s emotional and creative. I encourage you to write more of these miraculous stories.

  4. Ahhhhh … this captures up the tension that I think can be felt in so many endeavours. To succeed will be to do so in the eyes of others … and then we battle the desire to meet their expectations, suppress our own … There’s such a fine balance between connecting with others through work and art, while staying true.

  5. Captures the tension of pursuing a dream … whatever it may be. To succeed means doing so in the eyes of others. Then we have the tug of wanting to meet their expectations, sacrificing our own. There’s such a fine balance between creating work that connects with other hearts … without selling out your own. Your words and pictures convey so much more …

  6. clarthy said

    A modern fable but one that covers all of time.

  7. J.T. said

    To be or not to be, that is the question. -Shakespeare

  8. Creepy. But I liked it.

  9. mlh130497121 said

    Too beautiful!

  10. luminouszest said

    at very inspiring!!:)

  11. urarachan said

    It is my first time reading your story. I really enjoyed reading this. It was beautiful. Thank you very much!

  12. justplaincliche said

    Wow I really like the way your comic art looks, it’s just so suitable for the story ❤

  13. This is great. Well done. I love how this parable makes clear some truths of our human condition.

    Though the pragmatist in me also sees the parable as reflecting the recent Global Financial Crisis. Because the obvious epilogue to this story is that Sam’s death actually causes his artwork to rocket in value thereby leaving those who exploited his hard work much better off in the process. RIP Sam.

  14. askingamber said

    Beautiful!

  15. Mandy said

    Lovely post ! 🙂

  16. amoralamusement said

    A beautiful and emotionally filled story!

  17. brerwin said

    This is a fictional story but so close to the truth in life. Where we place our heart desire is not really where it should be and we die daily trying to prove to ourselves and others this is were we belong when it just as easy for use to change, one variable might have changed this whole out come. A lesson well taught.

  18. This was rather moving. The morals are great.

  19. jsackmom said

    I loved this I’m sure this is where the expression pouring blood, sweat, and tears, into your passion came from. 😊

  20. artmoscow said

    But Marc Quinn, who got famous making sculptural portraits using his own blood, whistles all the way to the bank ))) No sad ending there

  21. This is beautiful. A fantastic highlight on human passion and how it can both make and destroy a person. ❤

  22. Reblogged this on Just Your Average Chlo and commented:
    Check this out, it’s the most beautiful portrayal of human passion and how it can make and destroy a person!

  23. gonedau said

    Captivating story with great lessons. Something we can all learn from.

  24. I love the dark humor and truth..it was a perfect story for me on this Sunday. Thanks for the inspiration

  25. Such a delightful story. Great story for this peaceful Sunday evening. This is an eye opener for me.

  26. An amazing and heart-wrenching tale which showcases the 21st century precisely! *claps*

  27. caimbeul said

    Absolutely delightful.

  28. I’ll buy this when it gets published. I mean as a story book. ☺Great work!

  29. As a mindful fiber artist, filled with a dire need to awaken, be awaken, to help empower and inspire others, I pause: how like am I to Sam? Is my path,too? A grave sojourn? A fame of blood red? NO! I SAY! For his life, this quaint, charming tale you so poignantly share, sparks a dynamic reflective transformation! Love your work.

    Come visit; my door is open:
    Yarn, Chat & Possibilities
    aliciafiberarts.wordpress

  30. Reblogged this on juanitasplace and commented:
    Wow! An interesting cautionary tale.

  31. vialeo said

    Reblogged this on ViaLeo and commented:
    We’re all just dying to live

  32. Lekhamisra said

    I enjoyed the Sam Quinn’s determination to be an artist.

  33. Brilliant! Was Sam a lover of art or a lover of fame and fortune?!

  34. sillisoup said

    I love the drawings.

  35. anobokiti said

    Reblogged this on anobokiti's Blog and commented:
    Never understood the obsession artists and art lovers alike have with finding meaning and or giving meaning to absolute rubbish… But then, i do it too so… Why am i so obsessed? 😦

  36. Afia Yeboah said

    this is a great piece! Keep it up

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